• NZ Deserves Honest Swimming Standards
    A recently released report from NIWA showed that the Government's proposed swimming standards were worse than those from the 2014 policy. Despite the Government claiming to have a goal of swimmable rivers by 2040, their policy weakened human health standards and only applies to 10% of the whole country's waterways. This won't solve our problems. It will only make them worse. Please use this form to make an official submission to the Ministry for the Environment's National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management. Submissions are open now until 5pm Thursday 25 May. New Zealanders have asked the Government and the Ministry for the Environment again and again for a genuine swimmable bottom line for rivers & lakes. Aotearoa New Zealand has serious problems of freshwater contamination and polluted rivers and lakes. We must take steps to stop this situation from getting worse and to begin to turn this around. The first step is to write strong protection for rivers and lakes into our country's freshwater policy. We can do this now and, in doing so, it will influence the work of local councils, industry and government to improve freshwater management so that rivers and lakes are protected for all New Zealanders. The OECD wrote in its 2017 Environmental Performance Review that New Zealand is reaching environmental limits and that freshwater pollution is one of areas of degradation that threatens the health of our people, our environment and our economy. As Sir Peter Gluckman, the Prime Minister's Chief Science Advisor said in a recent interview on his report on the state of the nation's freshwater, "The reality is we cannot keep going as we have been." He's right and the public is right. We have to change and the first step for improving the health of our rivers and lakes is this freshwater policy. It is the document on which decisions around the country will be made. Let's make it the best and the strongest it can be for the sake of this beautiful country. [1] https://niwa.co.nz/news/niwa-technical-background-report-for-mfe-clean-water-swimmability-proposals-for-rivers [2] http://www.mfe.govt.nz/sites/default/files/microbiological-quality-jun03.pdf
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    Created by Choose Clean Water Picture
  • Cycle way Pohutukawa Coast
    This road hugs the steep coast and twists and turns sharply. It is lined with Pohutukawa trees and has unique scenic beauty with every turn as hidden bays and vistas emerge. It is a popular destination for weekend picnicking and fisherman. The volume of weekend traffic on the coast is rising exponentially each year and is a detriment to the coastal experience. A balance between the weekend motorist and outdoor activity is a sensible solution. By sharing the road with one way traffic and a cycle/ pedestrian way it will enable greater access overall. Currently it is difficult for vehicles to pull over to the shoulder to enjoy the view. Giving pedestrians and cyclists greater access and freedom will make this site a must do activity in the Auckland region. This section of the highway is not a commuter road and is in fact a slower route to Clevedon so the one way aspect will not have any negative affects to locals or tourists.
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    Created by Steve Kershaw Picture
  • Opoho “enviro” school put your words into action and stop burning coal!
    Coal is the worst fossil fuel to burn for greenhouse gasses. It emits twice the carbon dioxide as natural gas for the same amount of energy produced. These dioxides, namely nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide, and mercury can potentially lead to health implications ranging from asthma, lung cancer and heart disease to compromising intellectual capacities. Opoho School is marketing itself as having one of the highest standards of Enviroschools in New Zealand. It, however, burns between 12 to 14 tonnes of coal a year. Its environmental practices are contributing almost 40 tonnes of carbon dioxide annually to an already over-polluted atmosphere. The burning of coal is antithetical to any school’s mission. For an Enviroschool like Opoho School, its actions are hypocritical, unconscionable and should not be tolerated. What is the use of a school if you haven't got a tolerable planet to put it on? Will you allow your children to study in this polluted environment? Sign this petition today and stop the coal burning! http://opohoschool.iwarp.com/cgi/wp/?page_id=6
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    Created by Ralph Adler
  • Ban all Disposable Plastics in New Zealand
    More than 25,000kg of plastic waste is littered in New Zealand DAILY. 100,000 animals die every year after ingesting or becoming entangled in disposable plastic bags, in which have a devastating impact on marine animals such as whales, seals, sea birds, turtles and not to mention the coastline life such as mussels. Every year 8 -13 million tons of plastic is dumped into the oceans. It's equal to five grocery bags per every foot of coastline around the globe. The even worse news is that the tonnage is on target to increase tenfold in the next decade. In one incident in New Zealand a Turtle was found to have 224 bits of plastic in its stomach. At least 44 per cent of marine bird species are known to eat plastic, and too a sperm whale calf found dead in the Aegean Sea contained all kinds of rubbish, including 100 plastic bags. Every piece of plastic ever produced is still on the planet in one form or another, unless incinerated and every single person on the planet today will consume 136kgs of single use plastic in this year alone! Dianna Cohen, from the US-based Plastic Pollution Coalition, is supporting Waiheke Island's BYO Bag initiative, which aims to make the island plastic bag free. She says some of these chemicals, including bisphenol A (BPA) and hormone-disrupting chemicals called phthalates, have been linked to cancer, diabetes, obesity, Alzheimer's, autism, and a number of sexual problems like lower sexual functioning, sterility and infertility in humans. The National Green Tribunal of India passed legislation, effective beginning of 2017, to prohibit use of all disposable plastics. So I ask you, in a Country so rich with resources and options, why we are not in the forefront of change, especially with the abundance of sea and animal life that thrive in our coastlines and in our rich and dense landscapes? New Zealand is known across the world for such scenery, and phenomenal beaches, but if we remain in an ever expanding population and a contributor to the never ending cycle and production of waste product then we are doing a disservice to our environment, our animal life and our futures. *Economic data from 192 coastal countries bordering the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans in addition to the Black and Mediterranean Seas. They found that these countries created 275 million tons of garbage annually, of which 4.8 to 12.7 million tons of plastic flowed into the oceans Ocean plastic has turned up literally everywhere. It has been found in the deep sea and buried in Arctic ice. It has been ingested with dire consequences by some 700 species of marine wildlife.* This isn't just a matter of National urgency, or an animals welfare, but a global effort. Success is the sum of small efforts, there are voices asking to be heard and there are already other petitions to ban plastic bags; https://www.toko.org.nz/petitions/ban-plastic-bags-in-nz I ask you to please sign, please share and to support this change to support the economic prosperity of New Zealand's tomorrow.
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    Created by Samantha Harrison Picture
  • Pass legislation that requires palm oil to have ONE name (PALM OIL).
    Everyone deserves to know if the product they are consuming or using contains palm oil. Palm oil is impacting our environment/climate/animals/human health and safety: causing deforestation; habitat degradation; climate change; animal cruelty; indigenous rights abuse and people have been found to be allergic to palm oil. WE deserve to ask for choice.
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    Created by Jessica Kim
  • Stop funding the Wairarapa dams and other irrigation schemes: Greater Wellington Regional Council
    Wairarapa means ‘glistening waters’ and is home to many beautiful rivers, lakes, streams, plants, and animals. These waters are not what they once were and are under further threat from an extreme plan to build think-big irrigation dams to drive more industrial farming. These schemes invariably create wealth for a small proportion of a region at the cost of the majority - our tax money funding pollution. This proposal to build two dams, one on Black Creek and one on Wakamoekau and to also take water from the Waiawanawanga for irrigation is being led by the Wairarapa Dam company and subsidised by the Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC). Much of the water from these dams will be used to grow more grass for more dairy cows. The company predicts if they build the dams, land currently in dairy will double to over 13,000 ha. (1). It's not about hating dairy cows or their owners. More cows simply means more effluent finding its way to our water. This includes nitrogen-rich urine which leaches down through the soil and gets into waterways causing damaging algal blooms. Thus, pollution from more cows cannot be mitigated away by fencing or planting. Like many of our waterways in NZ, the Ruamahanga river and several other rivers and streams in the area are already polluted. Some of them are already classified unswimmable. (2) GWRC Councillors have already thrown 3 million ratepayer dollars at this polluting irrigation scheme and they may put in even more (3). Council should be spending our money cleaning up rivers, not polluting them further by subsidising irrigation schemes. The first dam site that was scoped was the Mangatarere Valley and it was ditched after fierce resistance from local people and farmers. The GWRC and dam company should expect continued resistance if they carry on with their polluting plans. This multi-million dollar irrigation scheme is only going to be possible if local and central government continues to hand over millions of dollars of public money to subsidise them. We call on Greater Wellington Regional to make the right decision for our freshwater and stop any further funding to the Wairarapa Dam company. Tiakina te wai! We want clean water! References BakerAG 2016 Water Wairarapa Future Land Use Scenarios. Report prepared by: Chris Lewis and Stefan Bryant GWRC, 2015 Is it safe to swim? Recreational water quality monitoring results for the 2014/15 summer http://www.gw.govt.nz/funding-for-wairarapa-water-project-study/
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    Created by Jade Waters
  • Save Te Waikoropupū : Tasman District Councillors
    Te Waikoropupū (Pupū) springs in Golden bay has some of the clearest waters ever measured on earth. And right now they are under threat from an extreme proposal to take water from the rivers that feed the springs and use it to water grass for more dairy cows. More cows would mean more pollution in these pristine springs. If accepted the proposal would allow the springs to lose at least 20% of their world renowned clarity. It would also allow the level of nitrate pollution go above what National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) has recommended is the safe upper limit. (1)(2) The springs are of immense cultural, ecological and spiritual importance to New Zealanders and are also visited by tens of thousands of tourists every year. They are Wahi Tapu (sacred place) for local iwi. But in the coming months, Tasman District Councillors could accept this drastic proposal from a group called FLAG - the Takaka Freshwater Land and Advisory Group. This would be a disaster for the springs, for New Zealanders and for the local economy that depends on tourism. Our international reputation and one of our cherished places of unique natural beauty destroyed forever. These councillors have a choice to make. They can either protect the springs, or they can choose more dairy cows. We the undersigned call on them to protect and safeguard this national and international treasure for current and future generations. (1)http://www.tasman.govt.nz/document/serve/Summary%20of%20Takaka%20FLAG%20process%20and%20interim%20decisions%20-16%20Dec%202016%20v41.pdf?path=/EDMS/Public/Other/Environment/Water/WaterManagement/000000709026. (2)http://www.tasman.govt.nz/document/serve/RM130269_HearingDocument6_FriendsGB1.pdf?path=/EDMS/Public/Other/Property/ResourceConsents/NotifiedResourceConsentApplications/Gunsboro/RM130269_Gunsboro_HearingDocuments/000000442707.
    13,175 of 15,000 Signatures
    Created by Save Our Springs
  • Truck Free Kaikoura
    While, of course, many trucks will still need to use the highway to make local deliveries along the route, this is a golden opportunity to encourage much of the large, long haul freight that does not stop along the way, off the highway and onto the most environmentally friendly modes of transport; firstly, coastal shipping and secondly, rail. This is not to promote a ban, rather it is to provide infrastructure that will promote and encourage a reduction in the some 550 daily truck trips currently required. Let's take this opportunity to create a world renowned Kaikoura Coastal Scenic Highway. Let’s reinstate the road through the Kaikoura District to include a safe cycle/walking lane separate from the Highway wherever possible and safely integrated with the highway around  the narrow, bluffy parts of the coast. Imagine the growth in prosperity for the whole region. Reinstate the rail for freight and a fantastic tourism experience with strategic stop-offs to compliment the cycle/walkway. 1. Honour our international obligations to reduce carbon emissions. 2. ‘Future proof’ the freight transport network against further disruptive events. 3. Create a much safer highway for all users. 4. Minimize highway repairs. 5. Create a quieter, more relaxed and people friendly Kaikoura Township for both locals and tourists to enjoy. 6. A safe cycle/walkway through the region will increase tourism opportunities and SH1 will become a world renowned tourist highway.
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    Created by lynda kitchingham Picture
  • Block the Offer: Christchurch City Council Meeting
    We ask that Auckland City Council advocate for both current and future generations by adopting a public position of opposition to oil prospecting and drilling and that they express this and on any occasion that they are consulted on this topic. Oil companies have been offered the opportunity by the New Zealand government to prospect for oil close to Auckland. Consultations about oil permit areas are held with Iwi, Hapu and Local Authorities (such as the Auckland Council ), who have the opportunity to put in a submission to New Zealand Petroleum and Minerals before Friday November 18th. There are many concerns about Deep Sea Oil prospecting and drilling including: The seismic surveying used to identify resources in the sea bed is known to be harmful, even fatal, to marine life and to mammals such as whales and dolphins in particular. If oil is found and drilling starts there will be significant risks to our harbours and coastline. The wells would be significantly deeper than the one in the Gulf of Mexico, which took months to close off when there was an oil spill, and devastated the ecology and the economy of the coastal area. We must not let this happen here. The Rena disaster demonstrated how unprepared New Zealand is for a major oil spill. Peak Oil is already here so we have to switch to different ways of living anyway. It is prudent to use the resources which are available now to move towards alternatives. The effects of Climate Change are already being experienced and it is now fully accepted that we have to change our oil dependent lifestyles. To have a moderate chance of keeping temperature increase below 2 degrees centigrade, the allowable global carbon budget for the rest of this century is 400-850 gigatonnes (Gt = 1 billion tonnes.) Coal, oil and gas mines currently operating or under construction will emit 940 Gt over their lifespan. This exceeds the carbon budget. Clearly more mines are not compatible with climate safety.The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned of ' irreversible and dangerous' changes to the climate if the use of fossil fuels continues. Climate scientists have indicated that we must act now to avoid catastrophic climate change. It is unjustifiable to risk environmental and ecosystem damage to search for a fuel that cannot be safely used without jeopardising the future. As governments legislate to limit greenhouse gas emissions, mining companies will demand compensation for their ‘stranded assets’. This will burden the taxpayer. We need no new oil infrastructure to create stranded assets. Oil production is not economically sustainable (extraction of a finite resource the use of which contributes to climate change could never be sustainable in any way) nor would oil production contribute at all to our local economy other than to have a potentially huge adverse impact if an accident did occur. Oil exploration, both in terms of the immediate risk of an oil spill but also in terms of the contribution to climate change, endangers fishing – customary, commercial or recreational, In fact the number of jobs created by oil exploration is relatively small. Many more jobs are created by investment in alternative energy infrastructure. The idea that Taranaki is an area made rich by the oil industry is simply not true. Taranaki people’s annual average income is lower than the national average. Most of the wealth in Taranaki is held in the urban areas, and people living nearest to the well sites (such as Kaponga, Eltham, Patea, Stratford East and Waitara East), are in fact the most deprived, which is reflected in their low socio-economic levels and high school decile ratings.’ The 620 people who are directly employed by the oil industry, and the 1,160 people who work in support services are subjected to the boom-and-bust nature of the industries price cycles. Even New Plymouth MP Jonathan Young has said that the region needs to explore other options, such as horticulture and tourism.Oil exploration therefore risks our economy but also people's well being. For generations people have lived off the abundance of the sea, for Tangata Whenua this is especially important as the sea is their food basket. We ask that Auckland Council advocate for the people and communities they serve by making a public statement of opposition to Deep Sea Oil exploration and that they express their opposition generally and on any occasion that they are consulted on this topic. We need to take real climate action now and say NO to deep water drilling. We ask our councillors to represent our voices. References: [1]http://www.nzpam.govt.nz/cms/about-nzpam/news/publications/petroleum-and-minerals-report-2013.pdf (2)www.mbie.govt.nz/info-services/business/business-growth-agenda/regions/documents-image-library/rear-2014/Regional%20Economic%20Activity%20Report%202014%20Part%202.pdf) (3) http://www.stuff.co.nz/taranaki-daily-news/news/64958753/Barrels-of-woe-for-Taranaki-oil-industry (4) http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/274583/drop-in-mining-royalties (5)Nearly one in four Taranaki kids doing it tough" - 18 July 2015 (6) Taranaki unemployment rates grow to 7.3%" - 6 August 2015
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  • HAVE YOUR SAY ON DEEP SEA OIL
    We should all have the right to have our say on deep sea oil in our country's waters. Deep sea oil could have a massive impact on huge stretches of our coastline and how New Zealand is viewed as a whole. We should have the right to make submissions, have hearings before a independent boards of inquiry, and the right to cross-examine oil companies. Making exploratory drilling for oil and gas a publicly notifiable activity will increase the cost for oil companies and is a positive step towards stopping deep sea oil in New Zealand. There are many concerns about Deep Sea Oil prospecting and drilling. The seismic surveying used to identify resources in the sea bed is known to be harmful, even fatal, to marine life and to mammals such as whales and dolphins in particular. If oil is found and drilling starts there will be significant risks to our harbours and coastline. The wells would be significantly deeper than the one in the Gulf of Mexico, which took months to close off when there was an oil spill, and devastated the ecology and the economy of the coastal area. We must not let this happen here. The Rena disaster demonstrated how unprepared New Zealand is for a major oil spill. Peak Oil is already here so we have to switch to different ways of living anyway. It is prudent to use the resources which are available now to move towards alternatives. The effects of Climate Change are already being experienced and it is now fully accepted that we have to change our oil dependent lifestyles. The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned of ' irreversible and dangerous' changes to the climate if the use of fossil fuels continues. Climate scientists have indicated that we must act now to avoid catastrophic climate change. It is unjustifiable to risk environmental and ecosystem damage to search for a fuel that cannot be safely used without jeopardising the future. Oil production is not economically sustainable (extraction of a finite resource the use of which contributes to climate change could never be sustainable in any way) nor would oil production contribute at all to our local economy other than to have a potentially huge adverse impact if an accident did occur. Oil exploration, both in terms of the immediate risk of an oil spill but also in terms of the contribution to climate change, endangers fishing – customary, commercial or recreational. Oil exploration therefore risks our economy but also people's well being. For generations people have lived off the abundance of the sea, for Tangata Whenua this is especially important as the sea is their food basket. We need to take real climate action now and say NO to deep sea oil drilling and making exploratory drilling publicly notifiable is a positive step in the right direction.
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    Created by Cape to Cape NZ Picture
  • Queenstown Lakes District Council - Block the Offer - Say No to deep sea oil
    We ask that Queenstown Lakes District Council advocate for both current and future generations by adopting a position of opposition to Deep Sea Oil prospecting and drilling. Consultations about Deep Sea Oil permits are with Iwi, Hapu and Local Authorities. There are many concerns about Deep Sea Oil prospecting and drilling. The seismic surveying used to identify resources in the sea bed is known to be harmful, even fatal, to marine life and to mammals such as whales and dolphins in particular. If oil is found and drilling starts there will be significant risks to our harbours and coastline. The wells would be significantly deeper than the one in the Gulf of Mexico, which took months to close off when there was an oil spill, and devastated the ecology and the economy of the coastal area. We must not let this happen here. The Rena disaster demonstrated how unprepared New Zealand is for a major oil spill. Peak Oil is already here so we have to switch to different ways of living anyway. It is prudent to use the resources which are available now to move towards alternatives. The effects of Climate Change are already being experienced and it is now fully accepted that we have to change our oil dependent lifestyles. The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned of ' irreversible and dangerous' changes to the climate if the use of fossil fuels continues. Climate scientists have indicated that we must act now to avoid catastrophic climate change. It is unjustifiable to risk environmental and ecosystem damage to search for a fuel that cannot be safely used without jeopardising the future. Oil production is not economically sustainable (extraction of a finite resource the use of which contributes to climate change could never be sustainable in any way) nor would oil production contribute at all to our local economy other than to have a potentially huge adverse impact if an accident did occur. Oil exploration, both in terms of the immediate risk of an oil spill but also in terms of the contribution to climate change, endangers fishing – customary, commercial or recreational. Oil exploration therefore risks our economy but also people's well being. For generations people have lived off the abundance of the sea, for Tangata Whenua this is especially important as the sea is their food basket. We ask that Queenstown Lakes District Council advocate for the people and communities they serve by making a public statement of opposition to Deep Sea Oil exploration and that they express their opposition generally and on any occasion that they are consulted on this topic. We need to take real climate action now and say NO to deep water drilling.
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    Created by Judy Kensington
  • Kaikoura District Council - #BlocktheOffer - Say No to deep sea oil
    This is our chance to protect Kaikoura coasts. Tell the KDC that we want a clear statement sent to Central Government saying NO to deep sea drilling off our coast, and YES to a thriving and healthy clean energy economy.
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    Created by No Drill Kaikoura Picture