• BAN THE USE OF A CARCINOGENIC CHEMICAL IN KAPITI COAST'S URBAN PUBLIC PLACES
    Recently glyphosate was classified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a Class 2A carcinogen, meaning, it probably causes cancer. (1) Glyphosate is the world's most commonly sprayed weedkiller and is the active ingredient in RoundUp (2) It is a product most Council contractors use in keeping both urban and rural public areas weed free. With cancer the leading cause of death in New Zealand, accounting for 29.4% of all deaths (3), it is important we protect the public, particularly children, from exposure to this chemical. The damning conclusion by the world's leading health experts means that the Council needs to take responsibility for protecting our health and making our beautiful district healthy and safe for all by completely stopping the use of glyphosate. The public spraying of this carcinogenic chemical is a violation of our human rights. We have already requested the Kapiti Coast District Council consider chemical free alternatives,. And research has proven cost effectiveness of hot water and foam treatment which is almost equal in cost to chemical spraying. In 2009 French Professor Séralini's two year study on glyphosate found it produced large cancerous tumours in rats (4). Because its effects are cumulative and not immediate (that is they only show up over a long period of time) people generally think it is safe. Dr. Don Huber, an award-winning, international scientist, microbiologist and professor emeritus of plant pathology at Purdue University (US) who has 55+ years experience in research and expertise in the area of plant pathology, says that contrary to the common claim of safety, a large volume of peer-reviewed scientific information clearly demonstrates that Roundup herbicide is chronically toxic to human and animal tissues and leads to cancer, premature death, kidney and liver failure, blood disorders and a host of other diseases (5). Dr Huber considers glyphosate is worse than DDT (6), and that there's also a correlation between glyphosate use & bee die off (7). Our environment has long been subject to frequent spraying of this toxic chemical. In 2009 France's highest Court ruled that Roundup (active ingredient glyphosate) is not biodegradable nor does it "keep the soil clean" as Monsanto had previously advertised. (8) It has now also been found present in human blood, urine and breast milk. (7) Help us make all public areas in Kapiti towns both glyphosate and chemical free now. [1] and [2] http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/04/150422-glyphosate-roundup-herbicide-weeds/ [3] http://www.health.govt.nz/publication/cancer-new-registrations-and-deaths-2011 [4] http://www.gmoseralini.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/GES-final-study-19.9.121.pdf (5) http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/roundup-herbicide-most-toxic-chemical-environment [6] http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/01/15/dr-don-huber-interview-part-2.aspx [7] http://www.gmoevidence.com/dr-huber-glyphosate-and-bee-colony-collapse-disorder-ccd/ [8] http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/8308903.stm
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    Created by Shekinah Worth
  • Email Auckland Transport to Stop the Spray!
    If you have already signed the petition, click here to email Auckland Transport and tell them that you want to be put on the "No-Spray Register" so that they don't spray Glyphosate outside your home. If enough of us get on the no-spray register this will have a big impact!
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    Created by Genevieve Toop
  • Keep fireworks don't ban them!
    The earliest documentation of fireworks dates back to 7th century China. They were invented more than 2000 years ago in China. China is the largest manufacturer and exporter of fireworks in the world. 90% of all fireworks originate from here. In 1240 the Arabs acquired knowledge of gunpowder. A Syrian named Hasan al-Rammah wrote of fireworks using terms that suggested he derived his knowledge from Chinese sources. The first recorded fireworks in England were at the wedding of King Henry VII in 1486. Dreaming about fireworks means that you like to be the centre of attention and are showing off to others. It also symbolizes enthusiasm and exhilaration. fireworks scare off evil spirits The fireworks were used to accompany many festivities, scare off evil spirits and promote prosperity. The largest chocolate firework was measuring 3m high and 1.5m in diameter and containing 60kg of Swiss Cailler chocolates. The firework was released in Zurich on New Year's Eve 2002. Fireworks are not fun for animals. Always keep dogs and cats inside the house when fireworks are being let off. Stay calm and make sure they have somewhere to hide. The biggest occasion for fireworks in the UK is Guy Fawkes Night (5th November). It is a celebration of the failing of the Gunpowder Plot on 5 November 1605, an attempt to kill King James I at the Houses of Parliament. The largest firework rocket is 13kg and was produced and launched in Portugal in 2010. Queen Elizabeth was so fascinated with fireworks that she created an honorary title, "Fire Master of England" for the individual who created the best fireworks. The word for firework in Japanese, 'hanabi', which actually means "fire-flower". Amédée-François Frézier published a "Treatise on Fireworks" in 1706, covering the recreational and ceremonial uses of fireworks. The book became a standard text for fireworks makers. shells and rockets A rocket can reach speeds of 150mph, however the shell can reach as high as 200 metres. A sparkler burns at a temperature over 15 times the boiling point of water. Three sparklers burning together generate the same heat as a blowtorch. When your sparkler goes out, put it in a bucket of water. France uses fireworks to celebrate Bastille Day and celebrate storming the prison of Bastille. The record for the largest firework display consisted of 66,326 fireworks and was achieved in Portugal in 2006. Static electricity in synthetic clothing can set off firecrackers. People making firecrackers wear only cotton clothing while making firecrackers. Italy was the first country to truly master and experiment with fireworks in Europe. They were the first to use shells for firecrackers to be loaded into canons and shot into the air. Half of all firework injuries are to children under the age of 16. sparkler heart The biggest annual fireworks display event in Europe is the International Festival concert held in Edinburgh, Scotland, in which a million fireworks are set off in less than an hour. At first fireworks were only orange and white. In the Middle Ages new colours were achieved by adding different salts. The hardest colour to create is blue. Sparklers can be used to make funny pictures. All you need is a totally dark setting, a sparkler to draw with and a camera recording a long exposure. A record breaking 56,000 firework rockets were launched simultaneously in a spectacular opening to the Plymouth, UK Fireworks Championships by Scientist Roy Lowry. A string of firecrackers that went on and on lasting 22 hours marked the New Years day celebrations in Hong Kong in 1996
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    Created by Anthony Gear
  • We support berm gardening in New Plymouth
    Growing food on public land has the potential to bring together people within communities. Road berms are an underutilised space which could be used to grow herbs and vegetables. They hold the potential to work as mini community gardens, where people stop by and chat to neighbours, share produce and stories in their daily loves. In days of old houses had big front yards and low fences. Outdoor living resided in this open area at the front of the house, facilitating neighbourly interactions ‘over the fence’. In today’s world of high fences and a heightened sense of separation from those living on our streets, this has been lost. Growing and sharing food on road berms is one way these barriers can be reduced. We appreciate there are potential issues to resolve around this, such as ensuring berm gardens do not impede traffic views, overhead power lines and the like. However we believe an outright ban on berm gardens would be an inappropriate response to people in the community engaging with each other through the growing of food.
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    Created by Laine Phillips
  • Stop the aerial spraying of harmful herbicides in QE Park
    The World Health Organisation's research arm, the IARC, has declared glyphosate a probable carcinogen. Glyphosate has been linked to tumours in mice and rats — and there is also what the IARC classifies as ‘mechanistic evidence’, such as DNA damage to human cells from exposure to glyphosate. The poison is being dropped by helicopters, the boundary of which is the newly built cycle path, only a few meters from residents properties. Poison was dropped early on labour day, breathed in by residents opening their front doors, as well as onto people in the park. Residents, growers, pony clubs and concerned human beings are worried for our children, our food, our water, our birds and animals.
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    Created by Peter Brooking
  • Children with Special Needs - Law Change
    According to Statistics NZ, 24% of all New Zealanders have a disability. This equates to 1.1 million people of which just over 500 thousand are children under the age of 15. The Education Act, 1989 does not differentiate between students who are 'normal' and students who have disabilities. The act governs all schools in New Zealand, including special schools. This has led to many children being unfairly treated in mainstream and special schools alike. For example, children with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) can be stood down for having an 'aggressive meltdown' something which is beyond their control and can be avoided with timely and non-aversive interventions. Similarly a child with Tourette's Syndrome can be stood down for swearing. Children with special needs are vulnerable to exploitation by 'uncaring' principals who have little regard for the symptoms of their condition and are only concerned with following 'the letter of the law'. Yes, they can 'legally' stand a child down for something that they can't help doing, but is it right? One can argue that some of these 'difficult' children should be in 'special' schools. This is not in dispute, as there is undoubtedly a need for schools that cater for children with severe or difficult to manage disabilities. The problem lies in the fact that children can and do get stood down from 'special schools' based on the same criteria that governs mainstream schools. The current act gives principals of special schools 'unlimited power' to stand down any student that they deem too difficult to manage. This is ludicrous as special schools are supposed to cater for children who display difficult behaviours relate to their disabilities. It is for this reason that the law needs to change so that our vulnerable children can be protected from being treated unfairly in all school settings.
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    Created by Gabriel Levy
  • Stop Hot Foot!
    Hot Foot and other polybutene based bird repellents are a cruel and inhumane method of pest control. It is a sticky glue like substance which burns on skin contact and can trap birds and small animals(1), literally gluing them to buildings! (2) It does not discriminate between native and non-native birds and the injuries that birds sustain may require them to be euthanised (3). Mitre 10 and the manufacturer of Hot Foot (Hot Foot International) claim that it does not harm birds but that is hard to believe when the product carries so many harsh health warnings for humans. For eye contact, you are supposed to flush with water for 20 minutes. For skin contact you are supposed to do the same and sponge the skin gently so the skin doesn't come off. If it's swallowed, it can burn the mouth, throat and stomach lining and they can't even pump your stomach so you're out of luck. (4) All of these things could happen to a bird who encounters the gel and tries to remove it by preening. Pest control does not have to be cruel. There are many products available on the market, even at Mitre 10, which do not cause any harm to the target animals. Spikes, nets, flash tapes, predator decoys and even similar non-toxic bio repellent gels are very effective and also humane. Hot foot is a barbaric product that has no place on Mitre 10's shelves--tell Mitre 10 to stop carrying Hot Foot today! --References-- 1. Hot Foot's own label details the risks of using the product: https://www.hotfoot.com/labels/gel-label.pdf 2. A sad story from Waikato in 2009 shows how a flock of native Welcome Swallows (Warou) were trapped against a pipe and unable to free themselves: http://www.stuff.co.nz/waikato-times/news/2774765/Bird-error-hard-to-swallow 3. A 2011 story from Nelson shows another incident where the majority of a flock of Welcome Swallows needed the be euthanised. Note the quote from Senior SPCA inspector Craig Crowley who says "I have never seen anything as horrible in pest control. It is unacceptable in any circumstances." http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/5256404/Distressing-sticky-end-for-trapped-swallows 4. This page details medical advice for emergency medical treatment. http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/search/a?dbs+hsdb:@term+@DOCNO+5158
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    Created by Ellen Ozarka Picture
  • Allow fruit and vege gardens on Auckland's berms
    We believe it's a great thing to grow fresh and healthy food to share with your family and your community and banning the growing of fruit and veges on the verge is verging on ridiculous. We're calling for Auckland Transport to drop this silly rule. We think these shared spaces could be used to produce food, connect neighbours and communities, share skills and grow for bees and beneficial insects. We're calling on Kiwi gardeners to use this space in a productive way - possibly to grow fruit, veges and herbs that they are happy to share. Here's some more information about this proposal: http://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/local-news/73074873/berm-gardens-to-be-banned-under-tough-new-rules
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    Created by Jo McCarroll
  • Queenstown Lakes District Council - Block the Offer - Say No to deep sea oil
    We ask that Queenstown Lakes District Council advocate for both current and future generations by adopting a position of opposition to Deep Sea Oil prospecting and drilling. Consultations about Deep Sea Oil permits are with Iwi, Hapu and Local Authorities. There are many concerns about Deep Sea Oil prospecting and drilling. The seismic surveying used to identify resources in the sea bed is known to be harmful, even fatal, to marine life and to mammals such as whales and dolphins in particular. If oil is found and drilling starts there will be significant risks to our harbours and coastline. The wells would be significantly deeper than the one in the Gulf of Mexico, which took months to close off when there was an oil spill, and devastated the ecology and the economy of the coastal area. We must not let this happen here. The Rena disaster demonstrated how unprepared New Zealand is for a major oil spill. Peak Oil is already here so we have to switch to different ways of living anyway. It is prudent to use the resources which are available now to move towards alternatives. The effects of Climate Change are already being experienced and it is now fully accepted that we have to change our oil dependent lifestyles. The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned of ' irreversible and dangerous' changes to the climate if the use of fossil fuels continues. Climate scientists have indicated that we must act now to avoid catastrophic climate change. It is unjustifiable to risk environmental and ecosystem damage to search for a fuel that cannot be safely used without jeopardising the future. Oil production is not economically sustainable (extraction of a finite resource the use of which contributes to climate change could never be sustainable in any way) nor would oil production contribute at all to our local economy other than to have a potentially huge adverse impact if an accident did occur. Oil exploration, both in terms of the immediate risk of an oil spill but also in terms of the contribution to climate change, endangers fishing – customary, commercial or recreational. Oil exploration therefore risks our economy but also people's well being. For generations people have lived off the abundance of the sea, for Tangata Whenua this is especially important as the sea is their food basket. We ask that Queenstown Lakes District Council advocate for the people and communities they serve by making a public statement of opposition to Deep Sea Oil exploration and that they express their opposition generally and on any occasion that they are consulted on this topic. We need to take real climate action now and say NO to deep water drilling.
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    Created by Judy Kensington
  • Kaikoura District Council - #BlocktheOffer - Say No to deep sea oil
    This is our chance to protect Kaikoura coasts. Tell the KDC that we want a clear statement sent to Central Government saying NO to deep sea drilling off our coast, and YES to a thriving and healthy clean energy economy.
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    Created by No Drill Kaikoura Picture
  • South Taranaki District Council - Block the Offer - Say No to deep sea oil
    We ask that South Taranaki District Council advocate for both current and future generations by adopting a position of opposition to Deep Sea Oil prospecting and drilling. Oil companies have been given the right to prospect for oil around the coast of Taranaki. Consultations about Deep Sea Oil permits are with Iwi, Hapu and Local Authorities. There are many concerns about Deep Sea Oil prospecting and drilling. The seismic surveying used to identify resources in the sea bed is known to be harmful, even fatal, to marine life and to mammals such as whales and dolphins in particular. If oil is found and drilling starts there will be significant risks to our harbours and coastline. The wells would be significantly deeper than the one in the Gulf of Mexico, which took months to close off when there was an oil spill, and devastated the ecology and the economy of the coastal area. We must not let this happen here. The Rena disaster demonstrated how unprepared New Zealand is for a major oil spill. Peak Oil is already here so we have to switch to different ways of living anyway. It is prudent to use the resources which are available now to move towards alternatives. The effects of Climate Change are already being experienced and it is now fully accepted that we have to change our oil dependent lifestyles. The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned of ' irreversible and dangerous' changes to the climate if the use of fossil fuels continues. Climate scientists have indicated that we must act now to avoid catastrophic climate change. It is unjustifiable to risk environmental and ecosystem damage to search for a fuel that cannot be safely used without jeopardising the future. Oil production is not economically sustainable (extraction of a finite resource the use of which contributes to climate change could never be sustainable in any way) nor would oil production contribute at all to our local economy other than to have a potentially huge adverse impact if an accident did occur. Oil exploration, both in terms of the immediate risk of an oil spill but also in terms of the contribution to climate change, endangers fishing – customary, commercial or recreational. Oil exploration therefore risks our economy but also people's well being. For generations people have lived off the abundance of the sea, for Tangata Whenua this is especially important as the sea is their food basket. We ask that South Taranaki District Council advocate for the people and communities they serve by making a public statement of opposition to Deep Sea Oil exploration and that they express their opposition generally and on any occasion that they are consulted on this topic. We need to take real climate action now and say NO to deep water drilling.
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    Created by Sara Smith
  • Palmerston North City Council - Block the Offer - Say No to deep sea oil
    We ask that Palmerston North City Council advocate for both current and future generations by adopting a position of opposition to Deep Sea Oil prospecting and drilling. Oil companies have been given the right to prospect for oil around the coast of Manawatu Consultations about Deep Sea Oil permits are with Iwi, Hapu and Local Authorities. There are many concerns about Deep Sea Oil prospecting and drilling. The seismic surveying used to identify resources in the sea bed is known to be harmful, even fatal, to marine life and to mammals such as whales and dolphins in particular. If oil is found and drilling starts there will be significant risks to our harbours and coastline. The wells would be significantly deeper than the one in the Gulf of Mexico, which took months to close off when there was an oil spill, and devastated the ecology and the economy of the coastal area. We must not let this happen here. The Rena disaster demonstrated how unprepared New Zealand is for a major oil spill. Peak Oil is already here so we have to switch to different ways of living anyway. It is prudent to use the resources which are available now to move towards alternatives. The effects of Climate Change are already being experienced and it is now fully accepted that we have to change our oil dependent lifestyles. The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned of ' irreversible and dangerous' changes to the climate if the use of fossil fuels continues. Climate scientists have indicated that we must act now to avoid catastrophic climate change. It is unjustifiable to risk environmental and ecosystem damage to search for a fuel that cannot be safely used without jeopardising the future. Oil production is not economically sustainable (extraction of a finite resource the use of which contributes to climate change could never be sustainable in any way) nor would oil production contribute at all to our local economy other than to have a potentially huge adverse impact if an accident did occur. Oil exploration, both in terms of the immediate risk of an oil spill but also in terms of the contribution to climate change, endangers fishing – customary, commercial or recreational. Oil exploration therefore risks our economy but also people's well being. For generations people have lived off the abundance of the sea, for Tangata Whenua this is especially important as the sea is their food basket. We ask that Palmerston North City Council advocate for the people and communities they serve by making a public statement of opposition to Deep Sea Oil exploration and that they express their opposition generally and on any occasion that they are consulted on this topic. We need to take real climate action now and say NO to deep water drilling.
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    Created by Anita Davison