• VOTE OF NO CONFIDENCE
    In the recent Local Government elections, the Horowhenua people voted in a new Mayor, Michael Feyen, who appointed as his Deputy Mayor, Cr Ross Campbell of the Miranui Ward that encompasses Shannon. The Horowhenua district had been plagued with many issues that the then Cr Feyen and Cr Campbell brought to the public’s attention. In brief they included the following: 1) The alleged ongoing pollution of the local waterways with sewage 2) The decision to tender the community housing stock for sale it appears, without proper consultation with both public and iwi 3) Forging ahead with a decision about moving the Foxton Cenotaph & upgrading the main street without proper and adequate consultation with the public and certain parties like the RSA, who were not in agreeance and who wanted clean water ahead of a street do up 4) Being instrumental in approving a third liquor license for Shannon, not wanted by that community 5) Council under the previous watch has accrued more than $68 million debt. At the first Council Meeting following the election it was moved that the books be opened however the Council voted against that. We want to see openness and transparency and believe a full audit of the books is necessary in order to move forward. Since the new Mayor has been in office, both he and his Deputy have not it appears, been backed by the current CE and are still being out-voted by the remaining councilors. In addition it has been announced by our Mayor that the Council intends to get rid of Ross Campbell as Deputy Mayor. We the public voted for change. Some of the issues our new Mayor campaigned on were: • open communication. He is now advocating opening the Council books which Council has voted against • quality drinking water and clean recreational waterways (clearly not a priority of the previous leadership) • living within budget (we have an excessive debt level now of over $68 million) • retaining the community housing stock (already up for tender) • cleaning up Lake Horowhenua which is so polluted it could potentially kill a small child (previous Councils having been instrumental in that pollution) • closing the Levin Landfill that drains leachate into the waterways The councilors under oath swore to put the needs of the district first, promising that they would “faithfully and impartially, and according to the best of my skill and judgment, execute and perform, in the best interests of Horowhenua” ...we feel they have failed to keep this oath in their failure to support the new leadership. We are therefore drawing to the public’s attention the fact that we as voters for the new leadership of HDC have no confidence in the current Council, particularly in light of the excessive debt accumulated. In order for the community to move positively forward, we would like to see the following people either in support of the new leadership or replaced: • Wayne Bishop • Ross Brannigan • Victoria Kaye-Simmons • Jo Mason • Christine Mitchell • Piri-Hira Tukapua • Neville Gimblett • Bernie Wanden • Barry Judd • CEO David Clapperton (1) Former Cr Anne Hunt speaks out: https://envirowatchrangitikei.wordpress.com/2016/02/26/on-two-occasions-horowhenua-district-councillors-given-a-clear-message-by-mayor-brendan-duffy-to-toe-the-line-and-deny-any-pollution-by-the-hdc-a-former-hd-councillor-speaks-out/ (2) An OI request describes consultation with public but not local Iwi as per the pledge to partnership set out on HDC's website: http://www.horowhenua.govt.nz/Council/Iwi-Relationships/Partnerships (3) Radio NZ article: http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/313804/community-up-in-arms-over-cenotaph-move (4) Stuff.co.nz article: http://www.stuff.co.nz/manawatu-standard/news/86330093/third-liquor-store-in-shannon-would-offer-variety-says-owner (5) HDC minutes on opening the books: https://envirowatchrangitikei.files.wordpress.com/2016/11/opening-the-books-horowhenua-district-council-open-minutes-2-november-2016.pdf
    335 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Rachel McAdam
  • Kaikoura's big businesses need support as well
    This interview actually brought me and a friend to tears. Have a listen on RNZ to the interview with Dennis Buureman. What Dolphin Encounter, Whale Watch and these other large businesses have done for Kaikoura with bringing in tourists and providing work is immense. What Dennis and his team at Dolphin Encounter have done for Kaikoura over his lifetime is massive, what the Encounter Foundation has done in the community is huge. The amount of work Lynette and Ian have done over many years is a massive investment in the town as well. Not to mention their many lifelong staff. Whale Watch is also a huge draw card to Kaikoura who offer huge employment opportunities. We need to find away to get John Key to help these main stays in Kaikoura because it goes back generations. These are not just businesses. They are families and their life's work which feeds the whole community and other businesses. Without these links in the chain the town doesn't work. And Whale Watch also has the same levels of contribution to the entire community.
    20 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Julia Lee Picture
  • Withdraw Statoil from our waters without delay
    This letter has been endorsed by Iwi and hapu of the eastern seaboard of Aotearoa. It is our ancestral waters that are under threat... We invite all New Zealanders, and indeed everyone anywhere who cares about the future of the planet, to sign on with us. Nā mātou, Ngā Hapū o Te Tairāwhiti tae atu ki Te Tauihu o te Waka Te Whanau a Tapuaeururangi Te Whanau a Kahu Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou Te Whanau a Te Aotaki Te Whanau a Te Aopare Te Whanau a Hunaara Te Whanau a Te Aotaihi Te Whanau a Hinerupe Te Whanau a Hinerupe ki Waiapu Te Whanau a Rakaimataura Ngati Putaanga Te Whanau a Tapuhi Te Whanau a Karuwai Ngai Tane Te Whanau a Takimoana Te Whanau a Hunaara ki te tonga Te Whanau a Rerewa Ngati Hokopu Ngati Horowai Te Whanau a Uruhonea Rakaimataura Te Whanau a Pokai Te Whanau a Hineauta Ngati Rangi Te Whanau a Umuariki Ruataupare Ki Tuparoa Ngai Tangihaere Te Whanau a Hinetapora Ngati Hinekehu Ngai Rauru Ngati Uepohatu Te Aitanga a Mate Te Aowera Te Whanau a Hinekehu Takutai Kaitiaki Trust Te Whanau a Iritekura Ngai Taharora Te Whanau a Ruataupare ki Tokomaru Ngati Hau ki Anaura Nga Ariki Kaiputahi Ngati Oneone Wainui Marae Tarere Marae Te Aitanga a Mahaki Ngai Tamanuhiri Rongowhakaata Iwi Trust Ngati Rangiwaho, Rangiwaho Marae - Te Kopua mai Paritu Ngai Te Ipu ki Whakaki Ngai Tu ki Rakato/Mahia Hikairo ki Whareongaonga Ngati Te Korou Pahauwera Ngati Kahungunu Iwi Inc. Ngati Hinepare (ki Kahungunu) Te Runanganui o Heretaunga Ngati Mahu Ngai Tawhao Ngati Kahungunu ki Poneke Rangitane Rangitane o Kaituna Motu Wairaka Marae Ngāi Tūmapūhia-a-Rangi ki Te Wairarapa Ngati Hinewaka Ngati Hine Ngati Hinepua Ngai Tarita Ngati Rakaiwhakairi Ngati Hinewaka Ngai Tukoko Ngati Ngapuoterangi Ngati Rakairangi Ngati Hinetauira Ngati Kahukuranui Ngati Rua Ngati Rongomaiaia Ngati Rangaranga Ngati Kahukuraawhitia Ngati Mamoe (Ki Wairarapa) Ngati Parakiore, Nga Ruahuihui o Tamaki Nui A Rua Te Iwi o Tamaki Nui A Rua Ngai Te Ao
    23,630 of 25,000 Signatures
    Created by Te Ikaroa Defending Our Waters Picture
  • Reinstate the right hand turn into Elizabeth St - Warkworth, NZ
    A sustainable solution to the Hill St intersection needs to be developed. Sacrificing the livability and function of the town is not acceptable. The functionality and feel of Warkworth is under threat if roading solutions do not support the township to thrive then it is toast. ...the notion that traffic turning into Elizabeth St is a major factor is nuts. Cars making this turn rarely (if ever) hold up traffic trying to pass through to SH1. Traffic has to wait to turn out from Elizabeth to head to Snells and Matakana but the traffic turning into Elizabeth St is not the bulk of what they wait for. This 'solution' is how a small town dies...priority is being given to traffic passing through our town at the expense of those who live, work, play and support the economy. Totally short sighted, money and time being better spent developing a solution that addresses the traffic sustainably while supporting our town centre and ability for our community to function as a community.
    258 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Cat Railey
  • Stop the Sale of Horowhenua's Community Housing
    In April this year the Horowhenua District Council announced it was tendering their stock of community housing for sale to an alternative community housing provider. The justification given by councils NZ wide, including, Horowhenua, to cease providing housing, has been that Government withdrew its responsibility in this respect (including funding) some time back. HDC insist they’ve identified that "the 'most sustainable' way forward for delivering pensioner housing was to transfer the stock and the responsibility to a housing provider that had the focus and resources to respond to the housing needs of the district.” At the same time they say they "… want to ensure that community housing in Horowhenua remains accessible and affordable, and is also connected to services that enhance social connectedness and wellbeing." Horowhenua’s Grey Power however, disagrees saying it is their belief that provision of affordable housing must remain a core activity for central and local government. "The proposal to sell pensioner housing, a key determinant of community wellbeing, is a direct antithesis to community wellbeing” they say, and "a council is in a position to see issues across its district and should have concerns about its constituency … a social housing provider will not have the same view." We also see the withdrawal of affordable housing for the elderly and disabled as a backward step. HDC state on their Positive Ageing Action Plan that “Horowhenua is a district that embraces its older residents as a highly valued integral part of the community”. We would like to see that plan include the option of the ongoing provision of affordable housing for the elderly, especially in the light of growing homelessness in our country. Handing over this responsibility to private and corporate interests is not going to guarantee they remain housed. A business will always strive to maximize profits and not to ensure the housing of the more vulnerable. It is simply not in their mandate. We therefore do not believe that any clause of sale that stipulates the needs of the elderly be considered will be effective, and that any such provision would eventually be discarded in favour of economic interests. In line with their pledge to partnership, HDC have said that iwi and current tenants were consulted. Public feedback however is not confirming this. We would like to see some transparency on this pre sale history. If you agree that the provision of community housing should remain a part of Council’s responsibility please sign our petition. (1) Horowhenua District Council agrees to put pensioner housing on the market <http://www.stuff.co.nz/manawatu-standard/news/78903531/Horowhenua-District-Council-agrees-to-put-pensioner-housing-on-the-market> (2) Iwi consulted on Horowhenua housing sell off http://www.waateanews.com/Waatea+News.html?story_id=MTQxNTY=&v=173 (3) ‘Keep Council Houses’ <http://kapitiindependentnews.net.nz/keep-council-houses/> (4) Government open to social housing options <https://national.org.nz/news/2016-05-27-government-open-to-social-housing-options> (5) Government, council seek interest from community housing providers in Horowhenua <https://www.nbr.co.nz/article/government-council-seek-interest-community-housing-providers-horowhenua-b-191828> (6) Proposed social and affordable housing transfer in Horowhenua and Otaki <http://www.treasury.govt.nz/statesector/socialhousing/horowhenua-otaki-sht>
    142 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Pam Vernon Picture
  • STOP GREYHOUND RACING
    Because thousands of greyhounds get killed every year because of their treatment behind the scenes of greyhound racing.
    601 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Finn Bargh Picture
  • Reinstate Helen Kelly's eligibility for NZer of the year
    This is important as Helen kelly had dedicated her life to NZers from teaching in Johnsonville, Wellington to advocating for the Pike River Mine workers.
    3,022 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by Jake Benge Picture
  • Timaru District Council - Block the Offer - say no to deep sea oil
    We ask that Timaru District Council advocate for both current and future generations by adopting a public position of opposition to oil prospecting and drilling and that they express this and on any occasion that they are consulted on this topic. Oil companies have been offered the opportunity by the New Zealand government to prospect for oil close to coast of Timaru. Consultations about oil permit areas are held with Iwi, Hapu and Local Authorities (such as the Timaru District Council ), who have the opportunity to put in a submission to New Zealand Petroleum and Minerals before Friday November 18th. There are many concerns about Deep Sea Oil prospecting and drilling including: The seismic surveying used to identify resources in the sea bed is known to be harmful, even fatal, to marine life and to mammals such as whales and dolphins in particular. If oil is found and drilling starts there will be significant risks to our harbours and coastline. The wells would be significantly deeper than the one in the Gulf of Mexico, which took months to close off when there was an oil spill, and devastated the ecology and the economy of the coastal area. We must not let this happen here. The Rena disaster demonstrated how unprepared New Zealand is for a major oil spill. Peak Oil is already here so we have to switch to different ways of living anyway. It is prudent to use the resources which are available now to move towards alternatives. The effects of Climate Change are already being experienced and it is now fully accepted that we have to change our oil dependent lifestyles. To have a moderate chance of keeping temperature increase below 2 degrees centigrade, the allowable global carbon budget for the rest of this century is 400-850 gigatonnes (Gt = 1 billion tonnes.) Coal, oil and gas mines currently operating or under construction will emit 940 Gt over their lifespan. This exceeds the carbon budget. Clearly more mines are not compatible with climate safety.The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned of ' irreversible and dangerous' changes to the climate if the use of fossil fuels continues. Climate scientists have indicated that we must act now to avoid catastrophic climate change. It is unjustifiable to risk environmental and ecosystem damage to search for a fuel that cannot be safely used without jeopardising the future. As governments legislate to limit greenhouse gas emissions, mining companies will demand compensation for their ‘stranded assets’. This will burden the taxpayer. We need no new oil infrastructure to create stranded assets. Oil production is not economically sustainable (extraction of a finite resource the use of which contributes to climate change could never be sustainable in any way) nor would oil production contribute at all to our local economy other than to have a potentially huge adverse impact if an accident did occur. Oil exploration, both in terms of the immediate risk of an oil spill but also in terms of the contribution to climate change, endangers fishing – customary, commercial or recreational, In fact the number of jobs created by oil exploration is relatively small. Many more jobs are created by investment in alternative energy infrastructure. The idea that Taranaki is an area made rich by the oil industry is simply not true. Taranaki people’s annual average income is lower than the national average. Most of the wealth in Taranaki is held in the urban areas, and people living nearest to the well sites (such as Kaponga, Eltham, Patea, Stratford East and Waitara East), are in fact the most deprived, which is reflected in their low socio-economic levels and high school decile ratings.’ The 620 people who are directly employed by the oil industry, and the 1,160 people who work in support services are subjected to the boom-and-bust nature of the industries price cycles. Even New Plymouth MP Jonathan Young has said that the region needs to explore other options, such as horticulture and tourism.Oil exploration therefore risks our economy but also people's well being. For generations people have lived off the abundance of the sea, for Tangata Whenua this is especially important as the sea is their food basket. We ask that Timaru District Council advocate for the people and communities they serve by making a public statement of opposition to Deep Sea Oil exploration and that they express their opposition generally and on any occasion that they are consulted on this topic. We need to take real climate action now and say NO to deep water drilling. We ask our councillors to represent our voices. References: [1]http://www.nzpam.govt.nz/cms/about-nzpam/news/publications/petroleum-and-minerals-report-2013.pdf (2)www.mbie.govt.nz/info-services/business/business-growth-agenda/regions/documents-image-library/rear-2014/Regional%20Economic%20Activity%20Report%202014%20Part%202.pdf) (3) http://www.stuff.co.nz/taranaki-daily-news/news/64958753/Barrels-of-woe-for-Taranaki-oil-industry (4) http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/274583/drop-in-mining-royalties (5)Nearly one in four Taranaki kids doing it tough" - 18 July 2015 (6) Taranaki unemployment rates grow to 7.3%" - 6 August 2015
    17 of 100 Signatures
  • Kaikoura District Council - Block the Offer - Continue to say no to deep sea oil drilling
    In 2015 Kaikoura District Council took a strong stance against deep sea oil drilling and requested "the exclusion of the entire proposed off shore Block Offer 2016 release area." This is our chance to protect Kaikoura coasts and make sure they do the same again. Tell the KDC that we want a clear statement sent to Central Government saying NO to deep sea drilling off our coast, and YES to a thriving and healthy clean energy economy.
    848 of 1,000 Signatures
  • Northland Regional Council - Block the Offer - say no to deep sea oil
    We ask that Northland Regional Council advocate for both current and future generations by adopting a public position of opposition to oil prospecting and drilling and that they express this and on any occasion that they are consulted on this topic. Oil companies have been offered the opportunity by the New Zealand government to prospect for oil close to the west coast of Northland. Consultations about oil permit areas are held with Iwi, Hapu and Local Authorities (such as the Northland Regional Council ), who have the opportunity to put in a submission to New Zealand Petroleum and Minerals before Friday November 18th. There are many concerns about Deep Sea Oil prospecting and drilling including: The seismic surveying used to identify resources in the sea bed is known to be harmful, even fatal, to marine life and to mammals such as whales and dolphins in particular. If oil is found and drilling starts there will be significant risks to our harbours and coastline. The wells would be significantly deeper than the one in the Gulf of Mexico, which took months to close off when there was an oil spill, and devastated the ecology and the economy of the coastal area. We must not let this happen here. The Rena disaster demonstrated how unprepared New Zealand is for a major oil spill. Peak Oil is already here so we have to switch to different ways of living anyway. It is prudent to use the resources which are available now to move towards alternatives. The effects of Climate Change are already being experienced and it is now fully accepted that we have to change our oil dependent lifestyles. To have a moderate chance of keeping temperature increase below 2 degrees centigrade, the allowable global carbon budget for the rest of this century is 400-850 gigatonnes (Gt = 1 billion tonnes.) Coal, oil and gas mines currently operating or under construction will emit 940 Gt over their lifespan. This exceeds the carbon budget. Clearly more mines are not compatible with climate safety.The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned of ' irreversible and dangerous' changes to the climate if the use of fossil fuels continues. Climate scientists have indicated that we must act now to avoid catastrophic climate change. It is unjustifiable to risk environmental and ecosystem damage to search for a fuel that cannot be safely used without jeopardising the future. As governments legislate to limit greenhouse gas emissions, mining companies will demand compensation for their ‘stranded assets’. This will burden the taxpayer. We need no new oil infrastructure to create stranded assets. Oil production is not economically sustainable (extraction of a finite resource the use of which contributes to climate change could never be sustainable in any way) nor would oil production contribute at all to our local economy other than to have a potentially huge adverse impact if an accident did occur. Oil exploration, both in terms of the immediate risk of an oil spill but also in terms of the contribution to climate change, endangers fishing – customary, commercial or recreational, In fact the number of jobs created by oil exploration is relatively small. Many more jobs are created by investment in alternative energy infrastructure. The idea that Taranaki is an area made rich by the oil industry is simply not true. Taranaki people’s annual average income is lower than the national average. Most of the wealth in Taranaki is held in the urban areas, and people living nearest to the well sites (such as Kaponga, Eltham, Patea, Stratford East and Waitara East), are in fact the most deprived, which is reflected in their low socio-economic levels and high school decile ratings.’ The 620 people who are directly employed by the oil industry, and the 1,160 people who work in support services are subjected to the boom-and-bust nature of the industries price cycles. Even New Plymouth MP Jonathan Young has said that the region needs to explore other options, such as horticulture and tourism.Oil exploration therefore risks our economy but also people's well being. For generations people have lived off the abundance of the sea, for Tangata Whenua this is especially important as the sea is their food basket. We ask that Northland Regional Council advocate for the people and communities they serve by making a public statement of opposition to Deep Sea Oil exploration and that they express their opposition generally and on any occasion that they are consulted on this topic. We need to take real climate action now and say NO to deep water drilling. We ask our councillors to represent our voices. References: [1]http://www.nzpam.govt.nz/cms/about-nzpam/news/publications/petroleum-and-minerals-report-2013.pdf (2)www.mbie.govt.nz/info-services/business/business-growth-agenda/regions/documents-image-library/rear-2014/Regional%20Economic%20Activity%20Report%202014%20Part%202.pdf) (3) http://www.stuff.co.nz/taranaki-daily-news/news/64958753/Barrels-of-woe-for-Taranaki-oil-industry (4) http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/274583/drop-in-mining-royalties (5)Nearly one in four Taranaki kids doing it tough" - 18 July 2015 (6) Taranaki unemployment rates grow to 7.3%" - 6 August 2015
    6 of 100 Signatures
  • Environment Southland & SDC - Block the Offer - Stop onshore and offshore oil and gas exploration
    We ask that Southland District Council and Environment Southland Regional Council advocate for both current and future generations by adopting a public position of opposition to oil and gas prospecting and drilling and that they express this and on any occasion that they are consulted on this topic. Oil companies have been offered the opportunity by the New Zealand government to prospect for oil and gas onshore in the Western Southland Basin and offshore in the Great South and Canterbury Basins. Consultations about oil permit areas are held with Iwi, Hapu and Local Authorities (such as the Timaru District Council), who have the opportunity to put in a submission to New Zealand Petroleum and Minerals before Friday November 18th. Please note that there was no southland area previously available. There are many other concerns about oil and gas prospecting and drilling including: The seismic surveying used to identify resources in the sea bed is known to be harmful, even fatal, to marine life and to mammals such as whales and dolphins in particular. If oil is found and drilling starts there will be significant risks to our harbours and coastline. The wells would be significantly deeper than the one in the Gulf of Mexico, which took months to close off when there was an oil spill, and devastated the ecology and the economy of the coastal area. We must not let this happen here. The Rena disaster demonstrated how unprepared New Zealand is for a major oil spill. Peak Oil is already here so we have to switch to different ways of living anyway. It is prudent to use the resources which are available now to move towards alternatives. The effects of Climate Change are already being experienced and it is now fully accepted that we have to change our oil dependent lifestyles. To have a moderate chance of keeping temperature increase below 2 degrees centigrade, the allowable global carbon budget for the rest of this century is 400-850 gigatonnes (Gt = 1 billion tonnes.) Coal, oil and gas mines currently operating or under construction will emit 940 Gt over their lifespan. This exceeds the carbon budget. Clearly more mines are not compatible with climate safety.The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned of ' irreversible and dangerous' changes to the climate if the use of fossil fuels continues. Climate scientists have indicated that we must act now to avoid catastrophic climate change. It is unjustifiable to risk environmental and ecosystem damage to search for a fuel that cannot be safely used without jeopardising the future. As governments legislate to limit greenhouse gas emissions, mining companies will demand compensation for their ‘stranded assets’. This will burden the taxpayer. We need no new oil infrastructure to create stranded assets. Oil production is not economically sustainable (extraction of a finite resource the use of which contributes to climate change could never be sustainable in any way) nor would oil production contribute at all to our local economy other than to have a potentially huge adverse impact if an accident did occur. Oil exploration, both in terms of the immediate risk of an oil spill but also in terms of the contribution to climate change, endangers fishing – customary, commercial or recreational, In fact the number of jobs created by oil exploration is relatively small. Many more jobs are created by investment in alternative energy infrastructure. The idea that Taranaki is an area made rich by the oil industry is simply not true. Taranaki people’s annual average income is lower than the national average. Most of the wealth in Taranaki is held in the urban areas, and people living nearest to the well sites (such as Kaponga, Eltham, Patea, Stratford East and Waitara East), are in fact the most deprived, which is reflected in their low socio-economic levels and high school decile ratings.’ The 620 people who are directly employed by the oil industry, and the 1,160 people who work in support services are subjected to the boom-and-bust nature of the industries price cycles. Even New Plymouth MP Jonathan Young has said that the region needs to explore other options, such as horticulture and tourism.Oil exploration therefore risks our economy but also people's well being. For generations people have lived off the abundance of the sea, for Tangata Whenua this is especially important as the sea is their food basket. We ask that Southland District Council and the Environment Southland Regional Council advocate for the people and communities they serve by making a public statement of opposition to all the block offers that are onshore and offshore and that they express their opposition generally and on any occasion that they are consulted on this topic. We need to take real climate action now and say NO to onshore and offshore prospecting. We ask our councilors to represent our voices. Block offers: Canterbury - Great south basins (offshore): http://www.nzpam.govt.nz/cms/permits/petroleum/block-offer/2017/images-files/sld-consultation.png/image_view_fullscreen Southland (onshore): http://www.nzpam.govt.nz/cms/permits/petroleum/block-offer/2017/images-files/gsc-onsultation.png/image_view_fullscreen References: [1]http://www.nzpam.govt.nz/cms/about-nzpam/news/publications/petroleum-and-minerals-report-2013.pdf (2)http://www.mbie.govt.nz/info-services/business/business-growth-agenda/regions/documents-image-library/rear-2014/Regional%20Economic%20Activity%20Report%202014%20Part%202.pdf) (3) http://www.stuff.co.nz/taranaki-daily-news/news/64958753/Barrels-of-woe-for-Taranaki-oil-industry (4) http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/274583/drop-in-mining-royalties (5)Nearly one in four Taranaki kids doing it tough" - 18 July 2015 (6) Taranaki unemployment rates grow to 7.3%" - 6 August 2015
    143 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Jenny Campbell
  • Gisborne District Council - Block the Offer - Continue to say no to deep sea oil
    We ask that GDC advocate for both current and future generations by adopting a position of opposition to Deep Sea Oil prospecting and drilling. Oil companies have been given the right to prospect for oil around the coast of Tūranganui-a-Kiwa, Gisborne region. Consultations about Deep Sea Oil permits are with Iwi, Hapu and Local Authorities. There are many concerns about Deep Sea Oil prospecting and drilling. The seismic surveying used to identify resources in the sea bed is known to be harmful, even fatal, to marine life and to mammals such as whales and dolphins in particular. If oil is found and drilling starts there will be significant risks to our harbours and coastline. The wells would be significantly deeper than the one in the Gulf of Mexico, which took months to close off when there was an oil spill, and devastated the ecology and the economy of the coastal area. We must not let this happen here. The Rena disaster demonstrated how unprepared New Zealand is for a major oil spill. Peak Oil is already here so we have to switch to different ways of living anyway. It is prudent to use the resources which are available now to move towards alternatives. The effects of Climate Change are already being experienced and it is now fully accepted that we have to change our oil dependent lifestyles. The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned of ' irreversible and dangerous' changes to the climate if the use of fossil fuels continues. Climate scientists have indicated that we must act now to avoid catastrophic climate change. It is unjustifiable to risk environmental and ecosystem damage to search for a fuel that cannot be safely used without jeopardising the future. Oil production is not economically sustainable (extraction of a finite resource the use of which contributes to climate change could never be sustainable in any way) nor would oil production contribute at all to our local economy other than to have a potentially huge adverse impact if an accident did occur. Oil exploration, both in terms of the immediate risk of an oil spill but also in terms of the contribution to climate change, endangers fishing – customary, commercial or recreational. Oil exploration therefore risks our economy but also people's well being. For generations people have lived off the abundance of the sea, for Tangata Whenua this is especially important as the sea is their food basket. We ask that Gisborne District Council advocate for the people and communities they serve by making a public statement of opposition to Deep Sea Oil exploration and that they express their opposition generally and on any occasion that they are consulted on this topic. We need to take real climate action now and say NO to deep water drilling.
    38 of 100 Signatures